March 9, 2022

But what if it really is the start of a bear market?

No bull market runs forever. While they can be scary, bear markets can be expected to occur periodically throughout every investor’s lifetime.

It’s also helpful to keep them in perspective. Since 1966, the average bear market has lasted roughly 15 months, far shorter than the average bull market. And they often end as abruptly as they began, with a quick rebound that is very difficult to predict—a case in point is the S&P 500’s pandemic-fueled bear market in early 2020, which lasted a mere 33 days from the previous high on February 19 to the trough on March 23. That’s why long-term investors are usually better off staying the course and not pulling money out of the market.

Source: Schwab Center for Financial Research with data provided by Bloomberg. Data as of 12/31/2021. The market is represented by daily price returns of the S&P 500 index. Bear markets are defined as periods with cumulative declines of at least 20% from the previous peak close. Its duration is measured as the number of days from the previous peak close to the lowest close reached after it has fallen at least 20%, and includes weekends and holidays. Periods between bear markets are designated as bull markets. Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested in directly. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

What should I do now?

Worrying excessively about a bear market can be counterproductive but being prepared for one is always a good idea. Consider investing strategies that potentially could help your portfolio—and your emotional wellbeing—in case of a significant downturn. Here are some additional steps all investors should consider:

  • If you don’t have a financial plan, consider making one. A written financial plan can help you craft an appropriately balanced portfolio. It can also calm your nerves and make it easier to stay the course when markets get bumpy.
  • Review your risk tolerance. It’s relatively easy to take risks when the market is rising, but market downturns sometimes can be a wake-up call to consider adjusting your target asset allocation. Consider how much loss you have the emotional and financial capacity to handle. Schwab’s investor profile questionnaire can help you determine your investor profile and match it to an appropriate allocation.
  • Rebalance regularly. Market changes can skew your allocation from its original target. Over time, assets that have gained in value will account for more of your portfolio, while those that have declined will account for less. Rebalancing means selling positions that have become overweight in relation to the rest of your portfolio, and moving the proceeds to positions that have become underweight. It’s a good idea to rebalance at regular intervals.
  • Take your life stage into consideration. If you’re a younger investor saving for a goal that is 15 or more years away, you have time to potentially recover from a market drop. However, the picture may change for investors nearing or in retirement. Regular rebalancing and appropriate diversification are important for you at this stage, and your risk profile typically will become more conservative as retirement approaches. If you’ve recently retired and begun to withdraw from your portfolio, you also should be aware that poor returns in the early years of retirementcan have a very negative effect on a portfolio; consider taking steps to avoid selling assets in a down market, such as reducing your planned withdrawals or postponing large expenses.



The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.
All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market or economic conditions. Data contained herein from third party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.
Past performance is no guarantee of future results and the opinions presented cannot be viewed as an indicator of future performance.
Investing involves risk including loss of principal.
Indexes are unmanaged, do not incur management fees, costs and expenses and cannot be invested in directly. For more information on indexes please see www.schwab.com/indexdefinitions.
Diversification, asset allocation and rebalancing strategies do not ensure a profit and do not protect against losses in declining markets.  Rebalancing may cause investors to incur transaction costs and, when rebalancing a non-retirement account, taxable events may be created that may affect your tax liability
The Schwab Center for Financial Research is a division of Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.
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